The Third Mile Solution

Here’s a real life story, told to me by a local nurse who walks several miles each day.
She relates: On my third mile, I was startled by a colt who galloped toward me at full speed, then suddenly stopped, stomped, and shook his mane. Oddly, he then galloped away. After the second time, I realized he was obviously trying to signal me.
I followed him and came upon a mare that was down on her back and struggling but her hooves and legs were entangled in wire fence. Horses panic wildly in this situation, to the point of exhaustion. She had fought the wire for hours, was spent, and hardly moving. Like a whale beached on a shore.
Other humans had joined in to try to assist. The horse was failing since their own weight is destructive to their bodies. A few more of us gathered to help and with enough muscle power we freed her from the wire, rolled her onto her feet, and then she was able to get up.
The colt was so happy it was dancing and skipping all around! Others said the pony had signaled them at the opposite end of the corral by galloping at a terrifying speed then, turning back toward the horse that was down.

Horses can solve simple communication between species without speech. And here are we, complex and full of all the intricacies of speech, language, writing and translations. We are past the third mile and we are down.
We can fix our entanglements with communication, cooperation, collaboration.
Let this be our solemn vow.

My grandfather driving a stagecoach.

My grandfather driving a stagecoach.

3 comments

  1. A great story. We hear about dogs doing this but this was a surprise. Did you see the pictures of the people trying to get a horse out of a swimming pool in FL. The horse had given up but firemen got him out. JW

  2. This reader is appreciates this story, the “third mile” reference point, the urging, and as a bonus the photo. Thanks for putting this out for us to savor, contemplate, focus, and act upon. You came through clearly La Fey Wit!

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